1943: Muddy Waters moves to Chicago

Born in Rolling Fork in 1915 as McKinley Morganfield, Waters developed a new style of blues music in Chicago and became known as “King of the Chicago Blues.”

April 29, 1943: The USS Natchez helps sink German submarine off Virginia coast

Bayonet from the USS Natchez
Bayonet from the USS Natchez

The USS Natchez was a small patrol frigate acquired from Canada in 1942.  She was used primarily as a convoy escort along the route between Cuba and New York during the war.

May 1943: 442nd Regimental Combat Team begins training at Camp Shelby

The unit was composed of Japanese Americans, mainly from internment camps, and became the most highly decorated unit of its size in U.S. military history during its service in North Africa, Italy, and Europe.

May 30, 1943: Private William Walker killed by local sheriff while stationed at Camp Van Dorn

When the members of the African American 364th regiment arrived at Camp Van Dorn, they refused to be segregated at the camp and challenged segregation in the nearby town of Centreville. Racial tension ran high, and when Private Walker was killed, the 364th rioted. In December the 364th was sent to the Aleutian Islands, where they performed garrison duty for the remainder of the war.

June 15, 1943: Army opens Foster General Hospital in Jackson

Nurse's Uniform
Nurse's Uniform

This medical facility was built for the treatment of wounded servicemen.  It was renamed as the Jackson V.A. Hospital after World War II and eventually became the G. V. (Sonny) Montgomery V.A. Medical Center.

Image:  Nurse’s uniform from the Jackson V.A. Hospital, formerly known as Foster General Hospital.

July 24, 1943: First German POWs arrive at Camp Clinton

Newspaper Published at Camp Clinton
Newspaper Published at Camp Clinton

Camp Clinton was one of four POW camps in Mississippi.  There were also 15 sub camps throughout the state.

December 26, 1943: Governor Johnson dies in office

Lieutenant Governor Dennis Murphree served the remainder of Governor Johnson’s term until Governor Bailey was sworn in.

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