Handmade Choctaw Quilt

On March 13, 2013, in Artifacts, by Amanda
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Nan Prince, assistant director of collections, brings us another post in her ongoing series about interesting artifacts in the Museum Division collection.

Choctaw quilt. Accession Number: 1972.28.7 (Museum Division Collection)

Choctaw quilt. Accession Number: 1972.28.7 (Museum Division Collection)

This quilt was made by Choctaw quilter Dorothy Thomas and her daughter Ivora Thomas of Conehatta in Newton County, Mississippi. This mother-daughter team worked together on quilts. This example, which is pieced with alternating designs of Choctaw girls and teepees appliqued on white squares, was acquired from the Choctaw Arts and Crafts Association in Philadelphia in 1972.

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Recently Digitized Maps

On January 2, 2013, in Digital Archives, Maps, by Amanda
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Map of the lands in Mississippi ceded by the Chickasaws to the United States in 1832 and 1834. Call number: MA/92.0089(b) copy 2 (MDAH)

Map of the lands in Mississippi ceded by the Chickasaws to the United States in 1832 and 1834. Call number: MA/92.0089(b) copy 2 (MDAH)

These maps were recently digitized and made available online:

City of Jackson, Mississippi. Call number: MA/2003.0118 (c) MDAH. Link to the catalog.

The Federal Aid highway system progress map, 1934. Call number: MA/2002.0104 (c) MDAH. Link to the catalog.

Map of the lands in Mississippi ceded by the Chickasaws to the United States in 1832 and 1834, 1835. Call number: MA/92.0089 (b) copy 2. Link to the catalog (pictured above).

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Maps Available Online

On May 30, 2012, in Digital Archives, Maps, by Amanda
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Plot of Vicksburg District for leasing abandoned plantations, 1864. Call Number: MA/94.0045 (c) MDAH Collection

Plot of Vicksburg District for leasing abandoned plantations, 1864. Call Number: MA/94.0045 (c) MDAH Collection

These maps were recently scanned and added to the online catalog. Click the map title to view the map or click “Link to the catalog” to view its catalog record.

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More Maps Digitized!

On December 6, 2011, in Maps, by Amanda
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A map of the states of Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia comprehending the Spanish provinces of east and west Florida as fixed by the Treaty of Peace between the United States and the Spanish dominions, ca. 1792. Call Number: MA/92.0022(a) MDAH Collection

A map of the states of Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia comprehending the Spanish provinces of east and west Florida as fixed by the Treaty of Peace between the United States and the Spanish dominions, ca. 1792. Call Number: MA/92.0022(a) MDAH Collection

Take a look at these maps which were recently digitized! Click the title to view the map image or click “View the catalog record” to see that map’s catalog record.

Hall of Fame: Greenwood Leflore

On September 13, 2011, in Artifacts, Portraits, by Amanda
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Nominations are currently being sought for the 2011 class of the Mississippi Hall of Fame. The Hall of Fame honors women and men who made noteworthy contributions to the state. Consideration for the Hall of Fame takes place only once every five years and any Mississippian—native or adopted—deceased at least five years may be nominated. The deadline for nominations is October 1, and elections will be held at a special meeting of the MDAH board of trustees in December. Click here for complete nomination guidelines.

This series recognizes members of the Hall of Fame, whose portraits hang in the Old Capitol Museum. Special thanks to Anna Todd, University of Southern Mississippi student and MDAH summer intern, for researching this post.

It is the responsibility of the nominating entity to fund the portraits, thus some members of the Hall of Fame, including Greenwood Leflore, do not have portraits.

Greenwood Leflore (1800-1865), son of a French trader and a Choctaw woman, was born in 1800. His mother was the niece of Choctaw chief Pushmataha. At age twelve, Leflore was sent to Nashville by his father to receive a formal education. Despite being generally disliked by the tribe’s full-blood men, he was elected chief of the Choctaw Nation while he was still in his twenties due to his maternal heritage. As chief, Leflore supported “civilization,” and he encouraged dramatic legal, religious, and educational reforms to the tribe. Leflore’s role in the 1830 Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, which arranged for the sale of the remaining Choctaw lands in Mississippi to the United States, lost him support among the Choctaw.

Shortly after negotiating the treaty, Leflore settled in Carroll County, where he won election to the state House of Representatives and the state Senate. He was a prominent man in society, and close friend of Jefferson Davis. By the 1850s, he owned more than 15,000 acres of land and was one of the state’s wealthiest cotton planters. His mansion, Malmaison, was one of the most elaborately decorated in the state. Lefore occupied the mansion until his death in 1865, despite having lost his cotton crop, slaves, and other property during the Civil War. The city of Greenwood, Mississippi, and Leflore County are named in his honor. He was inducted into the Mississippi Hall of Fame in 1996.