Chloe Edwards, of the Government Records Section, brings us this post in an ongoing series chronicling the construction of the Charlotte Capers Archives and History Building. Many thanks to Ms. Edwards for her research.

Photograph of the Capers Building in 1971.  Information and Education Division, Series 1349, Box 5562. (MDAH)

Photograph of the Capers Building in 1971. Information and Education Division, Series 1349, Box 5562. (MDAH)

Currently the home of MDAH’s Historic Preservation Division, the Charlotte Capers Archives and History Building was the department’s first purpose-built home. MDAH was long overdue for a building of its own after nearly forty years in the State Capitol basement (1903-1940) and a further twenty-three years in the north wing of the War Memorial Building. The department’s quarters at the War Memorial were cramped (its search room was a scant twenty-four square feet), which slowed collecting efforts. Perhaps more seriously, there was no way to control the temperature or humidity in records storage areas, resulting in inevitable damage to the records. Thus, in 1963, with the restoration of the Old Capitol and installation of the State Historical Museum within it complete, MDAH Director Charlotte Capers and Dr. R.A. McLemore (then president of the Department’s Board of Trustees) began campaigning for the funds to build a new home for the archives.

Sources:

Mississippi Department of Archives and History in-house workshop on giving building tours, June 10, 1971 audio transcript (http://zed.mdah.state.ms.us:8080/cgi-bin/koha/catalogue/detail.pl?biblionumber=104014)

Series 1258: Charlotte Capers Building Files, 1928-1992. Box 4899.

Subject file: Archives and History Building, 1966-1970

Subject file: Archives and History Building, 1971 (dedication year)

A Building Survey for a New Archives Building, for the Board of Trustees, Department of Archives and History, prepared by William D. Morrison, Jr., 1966

Tauches, Karen. “The Fate of History: The Old Archives Building is Under Review.” Burnaway, published July 22, 2011. Accessed April 3, 2014 at http://burnaway.org/the-fate-of-history-the-old-archives-building-is-under-review/

CR&HM. Accessed April 3, 2014 at http://www.dalepartners.com/civic-corporate/wfm-archives-and-history/

WFM Archives and History. Accessed April 3, 2014 at http://www.dalepartners.com/civic-corporate/crhm/

Money conversions performed at http://data.bls.gov/cgi-bin/cpicalc.pl

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Chloe Edwards, of the Government Records Section, brings us this post in an ongoing series about Mississippi Advertising Commission posters. Many thanks to Ms. Edwards for sharing these fun artifacts.

A Mississippi Advertising Commission poster wishing all a Happy New Year. Series 552, MDAH.

A Mississippi Advertising Commission poster wishing all a Happy New Year. Series 552, MDAH.

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Chloe Edwards, of the Government Records Section, brings us this post in an ongoing series about Mississippi Advertising Commission posters. Many thanks to Ms. Edwards for sharing these fun artifacts.

A Mississippi Advertising Commission poster wishing all a wonderful holiday season. Series 552, MDAH.

A Mississippi Advertising Commission poster wishing all a wonderful holiday season. Series 552, MDAH.

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Unearthing the Advertising Commission Posters

On December 18, 2013, in Archives, Government Records, by Dorian Randall
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Chloe Edwards, of the Government Records Section, brings us this post in an ongoing series about Mississippi Advertising Commission posters. Many thanks to Ms. Edwards for sharing these fun artifacts.

 

A Mississippi Advertising Commission poster. Series 552, MDAH.

A Mississippi Advertising Commission poster. Series 552, MDAH.

Government records staff at MDAH were aware that Series 552 of the Mississippi Advertising Commission Records contained many oversized items. Because the series had been minimally processed, it remained unexamined until the processing backlog had shrunk. It was then that they found this set of posters, in excellent condition despite being over seventy-five years old.

Series 552 also contains a set of feature stories produced by the Advertising Commission on different aspects of the state, including forestry, cotton, show horses, the Natchez pilgrimage, and winter legumes, which ran every other week from July 1938 to September 1939; an industrial promotion kit intended for use by local civic clubs or chambers of commerce promoting bond issues to finance industrial development in their town, which includes a set of posters plus cartoons and a feature story to be run in the local newspaper; and a set of copper printing plates used to produce the Commission’s “Historical Mississippi” brochure, although the brochure cover plate depicts a different design than that depicted on the brochure in this series.

 

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Chloe Edwards, of the Government Records Section, brings us this post in an ongoing series about Mississippi Advertising Commission posters. Many thanks to Ms. Edwards for sharing these fun artifacts.

A Mississippi Advertising Commission poster

A Mississippi Advertising Commission poster wishing all a Happy Thanksgiving. Series 552, MDAH

In 1936, the Mississippi legislature established the Advertising Commission as part of the Balance Agriculture with Industry (BAWI) program, championed by Governor Hugh White. The Commission promoted the BAWI and the state by encouraging Mississippians to pass bond issues to finance construction of industrial facilities. It also promoted Mississippi as an attractive destination for outside investment in industry and tourism. The Commission remained active until 1940, when its enabling legislation was repealed.

The posters strike two notes. The first highlights benefits of the program, including jobs, cash wages, and increased prosperity, and the hard work necessary to make the program successful. The second theme promotes Mississippi to outsiders. Conscious of the state’s reputation as poor and limited, a set of state maps advertises its schools, agricultural riches, history, literature, and recreational opportunities. The posters appear to have been intended for publication as full page newspaper ads.

 

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