Collections Blog

"Camellia Place, Built in 1841 by ?, Columbus." Call number: PI/HH/M57.7 (MDAH)

“Camellia Place, Built in 1841 by ?, Columbus.” Call number: PI/HH/M57.7 (MDAH)

The Mississippi Historic Houses Collection (PI/HH/M57.7) contains 488 photographic slides of historic houses in various cities and towns in Mississippi. There are exterior and interior views.

Click here to view the images.

More information is available in the catalog records. To view them, search for “PI HH M57 7″ in the online catalog.

 
First Baptist Church, Charleston, Tallahatchie County, Mississippi. Call number: PI/SF/CH/1986.0033 (MDAH)

First Baptist Church, Charleston, Tallahatchie County, Mississippi. Call number: PI/SF/CH/1986.0033 (MDAH)

The Churches – Survey Collection (PI/SF/CH/1986.0033) includes thirty-nine photographs of churches in Mississippi. Towns include Jackson, Natchez, Raymond, Canton, Brandon, Grenada, Water Valley, Charleston, Winona, Greenwood, Belzoni, Ruleville, Drew, and Church Hill. Also shown are rural churches in DeSoto and Claiborne Counties.

Click the link above to browse the images. More information is contained in the individual catalog records; to access, search “PI SF CH 1986 0033″ in the MDAH online catalog.

 

Chloe Edwards, of the Government Records Section, brings us this post in an ongoing series chronicling the construction of the Charlotte Capers Archives and History Building. Many thanks to Ms. Edwards for her research.

Photograph of the Capers Building in 1971.  Information and Education Division, Series 1349, Box 5562. (MDAH)

Photograph of the Capers Building in 1971. Information and Education Division, Series 1349, Box 5562. (MDAH)

Currently the home of MDAH’s Historic Preservation Division, the Charlotte Capers Archives and History Building was the department’s first purpose-built home. MDAH was long overdue for a building of its own after nearly forty years in the State Capitol basement (1903-1940) and a further twenty-three years in the north wing of the War Memorial Building. The department’s quarters at the War Memorial were cramped (its search room was a scant twenty-four square feet), which slowed collecting efforts. Perhaps more seriously, there was no way to control the temperature or humidity in records storage areas, resulting in inevitable damage to the records. Thus, in 1963, with the restoration of the Old Capitol and installation of the State Historical Museum within it complete, MDAH Director Charlotte Capers and Dr. R.A. McLemore (then president of the Department’s Board of Trustees) began campaigning for the funds to build a new home for the archives.

Sources:

Mississippi Department of Archives and History in-house workshop on giving building tours, June 10, 1971 audio transcript (http://mdah.state.ms.us/arrec/digital_archives/vault/projects/OHtranscripts/AU710_104014.pdf)

Series 1258: Charlotte Capers Building Files, 1928-1992. Box 4899.

Subject file: Archives and History Building, 1966-1970

Subject file: Archives and History Building, 1971 (dedication year)

A Building Survey for a New Archives Building, for the Board of Trustees, Department of Archives and History, prepared by William D. Morrison, Jr., 1966

Tauches, Karen. “The Fate of History: The Old Archives Building is Under Review.” Burnaway, published July 22, 2011. Accessed April 3, 2014 at http://burnaway.org/the-fate-of-history-the-old-archives-building-is-under-review/

CR&HM. Accessed April 3, 2014 at http://www.dalepartners.com/civic-corporate/wfm-archives-and-history/

WFM Archives and History. Accessed April 3, 2014 at http://www.dalepartners.com/civic-corporate/crhm/

Money conversions performed at http://data.bls.gov/cgi-bin/cpicalc.pl

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Looking Southwest Wharf Line Future Barge Unloading Position and Steel Storage Area At Center, 8/28/68. Call number: PI/SF/IND/1986.0017 (MDAH)

Looking Southwest Wharf Line Future Barge Unloading Position and Steel Storage Area At Center, 8/28/68. Call number: PI/SF/IND/1986.0017 (MDAH)

The Ingalls Shipyard West Bank Expansion photograph collection (PI/SF/IND/1986.0017) shows construction at the shipyard from 1968 to 1970.

Click here to view the images.

More information is available in the catalog records. To view, search “PI SF IND 1986 0017″ in the online catalog.

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Artifacts: Lowry Raid on Free State of Jones

On April 10, 2014, in Artifacts, by Amanda
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The Mississippi Civil War Sesquicentennial continues and in the coming months we will be highlighting Museum Division collections related to 1864 and the Civil War. Special thanks to Nan Prince, assistant director of collections, for writing this series.

This hand-made corn knife belonged to the Knight family. Accession number: 1981.60.1 (MDAH Museum Division collection)

This hand-made corn knife belonged to the Knight family. Accession number: 1981.60.1 (MDAH Museum Division collection)

Consisting mainly of yeoman farmers and cattle herders, Jones County had the lowest percentage of slave population of any county in Mississippi when the state seceded in 1861. After the passage of the Twenty-Slave Exemption law in 1862 by the Confederate Congress, which exempted anyone owning twenty or more slaves from the draft, many soldiers from Jones County left the army and returned home. Shocked by the harsh conditions on the home front, citizens led by Newton Knight turned Jones County into a haven for Confederate deserters in the spring of 1864.

This Confederate officer’s frock coat belonged to Robert Lowry. Accession number: 1960.157.1a (MDAH Museum Division collection)

This Confederate officer’s frock coat belonged to Robert Lowry. Accession number: 1960.157.1a (MDAH Museum Division collection)

Confederate officials sent Colonel Robert Lowry to squash the Jones County rebellion in April. Using blood hounds to drive Knight’s men out of the swamps, Lowry caught and hanged many of the rebels and ended the insurrection; although Knight himself escaped. After the war, the United States Army made Knight a commissioner in charge of distributing food to the poor and starving of Jones County. He made the unpopular choice of supporting the Republican Party during Reconstruction and in 1872, was made deputy United States marshal for the Southern District. Robert Lowry rose through the ranks during the war to become a brigadier general. After the war, he was elected to two terms as governor of Mississippi.

Source:

http://mshistorynow.mdah.state.ms.us/articles/309/newton-knight-and-the-legend-of-the-free-state-of-jones

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