Collections Blog

General Highway Map: Sunflower County. Call number: MA/2003.0309(c) MDAH

General Highway Map: Sunflower County. Call number: MA/2003.0309(c) MDAH

These maps have been scanned and linked to their online catalog records. Click on the map titles to view the maps.

Jackson, Mississippi 1979. Call number: MA/2003.0134 (c). Link to the catalog.

Simpson County, map no.4. Call number: MA/2003.0260 (c). Link to the catalog.

Oktibbeha County, Mississippi. Call number: MA/2003.0271 (c). Link to the catalog.

General highway map: Sunflower County. Call number: MA/2003.0309 (c). Link to the catalog. (pictured above)

Map of Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama, constructed from the latest authorities, 1826. Call number: MA/92.0060 (b). Link to the catalog.

Approaches to Grand Gulf, 1962. Call number: MA/92.0134 (c). Link to the catalog.

Mobile, 1960. Call number: MA/2002.0166 (c). Link to the catalog.

Wilkinson County. Call number: MA/2003.0241 (a). Link to the catalog.

 
Franklin County, 1810, page 4 (cropped). Call number: Series 486 (MDAH)

Franklin County, 1810, page 4 (cropped). Call number: Series 486 (MDAH)

Series 486 – Censuses, 1801-1816 consists of population censuses and census abstracts taken of counties in the Mississippi Territory. Generally, the census lists heads of families by name with members of the household cited by age, race (and if black, whether slave or free), and gender. Abstracts of censuses give totals only for age, race and gender.

The records also include an 1809 abstract for manufacturing establishments and products. There is a cover letter from W. E. Boyd that accompanied an unidentified census and an 1810 circular with instructions for taking the census.

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Over 100 Broadsides Digitized

On March 5, 2014, in Broadsides, Digital Archives, by Amanda
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Civil Rights Era broadside. Call number: Broadside file/Civil rights/Folder 4/Undated 2 (MDAH)

Civil Rights Era broadside. Call number: Broadside file/Civil rights/Folder 4/Undated 2 (MDAH)

One hundred ten broadsides from the MDAH collection were recently scanned and linked to the online catalog. Broadsides are typically large sheets of paper printed on one side, and these selections cover topics from Mississippi politics to World War II to the Civil Rights Era and more. To explore the broadsides, visit the online catalog, select the “Advanced Search” tab, then limit the search by checking the “Broadsides” box. Click “Link to electronic resource” to view images of digitized broadsides.

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Freedom Vote: The Results

On February 28, 2014, in Archives, by Dorian Randall
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In recognition of Black History Month, this is the last in a series of posts showcasing the Freedom Vote campaign of 1963, especially the Freedom Days of 1964. This series chronicled the campaign in Hattiesburg, Mississippi. Dorian Randall and Sara Rowe Sims wrote the accompanying text.

Demonstrations associated with Freedom Day, January 22, 1964, Hattiesburg (Miss.). Bobbie Jean Evans, Palmer’s Crossing, Forrest County. Call number: PI/1994.0005, Moncrief (Winfred) Photograph Collection. (MDAH)

Demonstrations associated with Freedom Day, January 22, 1964, Hattiesburg (Miss.). Bobbie Jean Evans, Palmer’s Crossing, Forrest County. Call number: PI/1994.0005, Moncrief (Winfred) Photograph Collection. (MDAH)

Despite harassment and arrests during the voting drive, many registrants decided to vote. Ballots were cast during church services, and ballot boxes were placed in local businesses such as grocery stores, cafes, beauty parlors, and pool halls. About twenty-five thousand ballots were distributed through the mail anonymously, but there was still a battle as intimidation surrounded the mock election. COFO’s goal was to acquire two hundred thousand votes, but the campaign resulted in more than eighty three-thousand votes. Hattiesburg accounted for 3,500. Although the goal was not met, movement workers were proud of the outcome. COFO staff capitalized on the campaign’s momentum and expanded throughout Leake and Issaquena counties, as well as Meridian. The question remained of whether to devise another statewide program to affect change in Mississippi. A week after the Freedom Vote, workers met in Greenville to discuss future strategies. This meeting was the impetus for the Mississippi Freedom Summer Project.

Source: John Dittmer, Local People: The Struggle for Civil Rights in Mississippi (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1995), 203-207.

 
Group of people sitting in church pews. Call number: Z/2312.000, Series 3 (MDAH)

Group of people sitting in church pews. Call number: Z/2312.000, Series 3 (MDAH)

The Thomas Foner Freedom Summer Papers (Z/2312.000) were recently digitized. A New York native, Foner volunteered in Mississippi during the summer of 1964. He worked on voter registration in Canton and as a project leader in Philadelphia. His collection includes correspondence, a report on voter registration work in Canton, photographs, and newsclippings.

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