Paper Archives

Page one of the Mississippi Constitution of 1832. Call Number: Series 549 (MDAH Collection)

Page one of the Mississippi Constitution of 1832. Call Number: Series 549 (MDAH Collection)

The Mississippi Constitutions of 1817, 1832, 1868, and 1890 are now available to view online! Access them at http://mdah.state.ms.us/arrec/digital_archives/constitutions/.

Tagged with:
 
Official MissPres 101 Places to See Before You Die Map

Official MissPres 101 Places to See Before You Die Map (Preservation in Mississippi blog)

Black History Month

The Columbus-Lowndes Public Library is featuring local African American history in Ferbruary on its “Local History Announcements” blog.

The National Archives has photographs related to the Tuskegee Airmen. Find out more in this blog post from NARAtions.

Read about the 1942 Negro League World Series and the match up of two great African American baseball players in this post from the National Museum of American History’s “O Say Can You See?” blog.

This post from the “Picture This” blog surveys civil rights era photographs in the Library of Congress collection.

The Smithsonian Collections Blog uses a photograph of composer Duke Ellington to discuss issues related archival practice and digitization.

Valentine’s Day

The National Museum of American History explores love stories in its collections in this post from the “O Say Can You See?” blog.

Explore historic Valentine’s Day cards on the “Picture This” blog of the Library of Congress.

Of Interest

Check out the “Official MissPres 101 Places to See Before You Die Map” on the Preservation in Mississippi blog.

What did Washington, D.C., look like in the 1860s? Find out in this post from the National Museum of American History’s “O Say Can You See?” blog.

Listen to audio clips from Monitor Records albums such as “Russian Cabaret” and “Vienna by Night” on the Smithsonian Collections Blog.

Natchez Mardi Gras in 1900

On February 21, 2012, in Digital Archives, Paper Archives, by Amanda
0
Natchez Mardi Gras Association broadside, February 27, 1900. Call Number: OSXBroadsides/1900 (MDAH Collection)

Natchez Mardi Gras Association broadside, February 27, 1900. Call Number: OSXBroadsides/1900 (MDAH Collection)

This broadside (OSXBroadsides/1900) was discovered within a larger collection of materials from the attic of the Elms in Natchez. The two sided broadside was recently scanned and made available online through the catalog (click here to access both sides). Many of the other materials from the attic are now in Z/1879 The Elms Papers at MDAH.

Tagged with:
 

We will be exploring Mississippi’s rich aviation history in this series. From early flight photographs to the moon landing and beyond, MDAH collections document this exciting part of our past.

The Dutchmen at Jackson Army Air Base. Call Number: Z/0839.001/S (MDAH Collection)

The Dutchmen at Jackson Army Air Base. Call Number: Z/0839.001/S (MDAH Collection)

The story of the Flying Dutchmen has become a kind of legend in Jackson. It doesn’t show up in most history books, but if you ask any of our older residents, chances are they’ll tell you stories about them flying under power lines and the like. But what really happened in 1942? Who were the “Flying Dutchmen” of Jackson? Much of this information can be found in the MDAH collection! Here’s the story:

Near the beginning of World War II, Hitler’s Germany overran the Netherlands, and later its colony, the Netherlands East Indies (now Indonesia) was conquered by the Japanese as they attacked southeast Asia, the Philippines, and the Indonesian archipelago. The Dutch were without a home, and more importantly for the war effort, without training bases for their armed forces. This is where Jackson, Mississippi, comes into the story. The Dutch needed a base for a flying school, and General Henry Arnold (head of the U.S. Army Air Force) obliged, choosing Jackson as the new home of the Royal Netherlands Military Flying School.

Old Terminal (c. 1936) at Hawkins Field in 2008

Old Terminal (c. 1936) at Hawkins Field in 2008

The city was already home to the Jackson Army Air Base at Hawkins Field when the Dutchmen arrived in May 1942, many with their wives and children in tow. Jackson became an international city literally overnight, as the foreign-speaking Dutch and native Indonesians wandered the streets and explored their new home. They delighted in shopping and eating in restaurants, pleasures that were hard to come by in war-ravaged Europe and the Pacific.

The Dutch fliers trained here for nearly two years, and during that time formed warm attachments with the locals, who reciprocated in kind. Some of the Dutchmen married Jackson girls and settled down in Mississippi after the war. Over thirty Dutchmen who were killed in training accidents are buried at Cedarlawn Cemetery in Jackson. Several of airmen and one widow have been buried there in more recent years.

Memorial Day ceremony at Cedarlawn Cemetery in 2009

Memorial Day ceremony at Cedarlawn Cemetery in 2009

The monument at the Dutch plot reads: Voor Hen Die Vielen (For Those Who Fell) and lists the fliers killed in training accidents.

Their story has been somewhat forgotten in the annals of Mississippi history, but it is one of Jackson’s hidden treasures, documented here at the archives.

"Dutchman Row" street sign near Hawkins Field

“Dutchman Row” street sign near Hawkins Field

Sources:

Barber (Bette E.) Photograph Collection. MDAH call number Z/0839.001/S.

The Clarion Ledger, 1942-44. On file at MDAH.

“Dutch in Jackson,” subject file, MDAH.

Jackson Army Air Base News, 1942-1944. On file at MDAH.

Lutgert, W.H., and R. de Winter. Voor Hen die Vielen. The Hague, Holland: Historical Section of the Netherlands Air Staff, 1992. MDAH call number 949.2/L973v/1992.

“Netherlands Flying School,” subject file, MDAH.

Remous: Organ of the Royal Netherlands Military Flying School. March-December 1943. MDAH call number OS/949.2/R81r/D.

Stubbs, Ben. The Dutch Fliers. Interview with Fred Streuding on January 17, 2000. MDAH call number 949.2/S932d/2000.

Van der Laan, 1st Lt. R., ed. Royal Netherlands Military Flying School in United States of
America
. New York: E.W. Smith and Company, 1943. MDAH call number 949.2/R81.

Tagged with:
 

We will be exploring Mississippi’s rich aviation history in this series. From early flight photographs to the moon landing and beyond, MDAH collections document this exciting part of our past.

Photograph from the Matthews (Burnita Shelton) Papers, Z/1965.000 (MDAH Collection).

Photograph from the Matthews (Burnita Shelton) Papers, Z/1965.000 (MDAH Collection).

This photograph represents one of those times when a researcher comes across an unexpected treasure in the archives.  The photograph, from the Matthews (Burnita Shelton) Papers, depicts (l-r) Judge Burnita Shelton Matthews; Mrs. Harvey W. Wiley, National Woman’s Party; Amelia Earhart, famous aviatrix; Anita Pollitzer, National Woman’s Party; and Mrs. Ruth Taunton at the White House in 1932. Earhart, the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic, is immediately recognizable because of her tall stature and short haircut. Matthews was a Mississippi native who was a prominent figure in the women’s movement.

Burnita Shelton Matthews. Accession Number: 1993.14.1 (Museum Division Collection)

Burnita Shelton Matthews. Accession Number: 1993.14.1 (Museum Division Collection)

Burnita Shelton Matthews (1894-1988) was born in Burnell, Mississippi, and studied music and voice in Cincinnati before marrying lawyer Percy Matthews in 1917. She studied law at the National University in Washington, D.C., (now George Washington University) and received the bachelor of laws degree in 1919. She practiced law in Washington, D.C., for twenty-five years and was actively involved in the National Woman’s Party. In the photograph at top, she is pictured with the leaders of the National Woman’s Party and Earhart, who also was a strong supporter of women’s rights and the Equal Rights Amendment.

Matthews was appointed to the United States District Court of the District of Columbia by President Harry S. Truman on October 21, 1949, becoming the first woman to be appointed as a federal district court judge. She retired from that position in 1968 and continued to serve on other federal courts until 1983. She died in 1988 and is buried in the Shelton family cemetery in Copiah County.

Matthews is in the Mississippi Hall of Fame and the portrait above, as well as other Hall of Fame portraits, are on exhibit at the Old Capitol Museum.

Tagged with: