Paper Archives

Rapalje/Rapalji Notebook Digitized

On May 21, 2014, in Paper Archives, by Amanda
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Page showing Choctaw vocabulary words. Call number: Z/0580.000, item 60 (MDAH)

Page showing Choctaw vocabulary words. Call number: Z/0580.000, item 60 (MDAH)

This trader’s notebook of George Rapalji of the Natchez District contains accounts, miscellaneous notes, and Choctaw vocabulary words for the period April 9, 1788, through April 1, 1797, written on forward and then reverse pages in the notebook. Accounts include customer names, some of which are Choctaw, and a list of items purchased or traded as well as amounts owed and paid.

Rapalji traded such items as thread, knives, gunpowder, salt, sugar, coffee, tobacco, and animal skins. He also dealt in livestock, as evidenced by the livestock inventories (pages 14 and 28). Rapalji recorded memoranda of events, recipes, home remedies, and geographic notes regarding the Mobile and Tombecbe [Tombigbee] Rivers.

Of note is the list of inhabitants on the Big Black River, which includes the years they settled in the area (pages 19-23). Of particular interest are the pages containing Choctaw words and phrases with their English equivalents (pages 10, 43-76).

 
Group of people sitting in church pews. Call number: Z/2312.000, Series 3 (MDAH)

Group of people sitting in church pews. Call number: Z/2312.000, Series 3 (MDAH)

The Thomas Foner Freedom Summer Papers (Z/2312.000) were recently digitized. A New York native, Foner volunteered in Mississippi during the summer of 1964. He worked on voter registration in Canton and as a project leader in Philadelphia. His collection includes correspondence, a report on voter registration work in Canton, photographs, and newsclippings.

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Gulf, Mobile, and Ohio Railroad timetable, part 1. From "Railroads Gulf Mobile Ohio" subject file, MDAH.

Gulf, Mobile, and Ohio Railroad timetable, part 1. From “Railroads Gulf Mobile Ohio” subject file, MDAH.

The Gulf, Mobile, and Ohio Railroad formed in 1940 when the Mobile and Ohio line merged with the Gulf, Mobile, and Northern. This brochure promotes travel between St. Louis, Missouri, and Mobile, Alabama. Trains stopped in Jackson, Meridian, Laurel, and many places in between. The cost for a seat from New Orleans to Jackson? Seventy-five cents (see page six of the brochure).1

This timetable brochure is housed in the “Railroads Gulf Mobile and Ohio” subject file. Click here to view the brochure through its catalog record.

1 James H. Lemly, The Gulf, Mobile and Ohio: A Railroad That Had to Expand or Expire (Richard D. Irwin, 1953), introduction, http://www.acmeme.org/gmo/introduction.htm.

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Circular, Jas. Monroe to secretary of Mississippi Territory. Call Number: Series 499, doc number 5 (MDAH)

Circular, Jas. Monroe to secretary of Mississippi Territory. Call Number: Series 499, doc number 5 (MDAH)

Series 499: Alien Enemies Documents (War of 1812), 1812-1815, contains documents relating to the monitoring of British subjects in the Mississippi Territory during the period when the U.S. was engaged in the War of 1812. A circular dated July 11, 1812, and signed by U.S. Secretary of State James Monroe declared that “all subjects of His Britannic Majesty, residing within the United States, have become alien enemies…” (See document # 5 above). As such, British subjects were compelled by law to report to their respective territorial secretaries, who in turn reported to the U.S. Department of State. The following information was required in the reporting process: age, length of time in the U.S., family description, place of residence, occupation, and whether or not application for naturalization had been made.

The documents include copies of the pertinent acts and instructions transmitted to and throughout the territories, individual reports of British subjects (many of which include place of birth – Great Britain, Ireland, and Scotland), and returns of county officials reporting in summary to the territorial secretary. Also included are a number of related documents such as accompanying cover letters and communications with the U.S. Secretary of State.

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This page shows 10 year old Elvis Presley. Series 21: Enumeration of Educable Children, Lee County, 1945, p 68 (MDAH)

Ten year old Elvis Presley is listed on this page of Series 21: Enumeration of Educable Children (Lee County, 1945, p 68, MDAH)

Genealogy researchers have another tool to locate ancestors in two recently digitized government records collections, Series 105, Educable Children Lists and Series 21, Enumeration of Educable Children. Educable children records have proven invaluable to researchers trying to locate elusive Mississippians, as some families missed by the state or federal census may be found in these records. They also include records from the 1950s which is useful to researchers because the most recent census available is the 1940 census.

The materials presented here include lists of educable (school age) children submitted by Mississippi counties to the state’s Secretary of State and Department of Education. The lists vary in content by year and may include such information as name, age, gender, race, election district or ward, name of parent or guardian, address, and reason for withdrawal from school. The records, which are not indexed, are grouped by county. Click here to learn more and browse the records.

Pictured above is the record of ten year old Elvis Presley in the Enumeration of Educable Children for Lee County in 1945. Elvis is listed with his father, V.E. (Vernon Elvis) Presley and was attending East Tupelo School.

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