Artifacts

Artifacts: Circuit Rider’s Communion Set

On July 31, 2013, in Artifacts, by Amanda
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Nan Prince, assistant director of collections, brings us this post in her ongoing series about neat artifacts in the Museum Division collection.

William Winans' communion set. Accession number: 1960.215.1a, 2a, and 3 (Museum Division collection)

William Winans’ communion set. Accession number: 1960.215.1a, 2a, and 3 (Museum Division collection)

This communion set reputedly belonged to William Winans, an early circuit rider and one of the pioneers of Methodism in Mississippi. Born on  November 3, 1788, in Chestnut Ridge, Pennsylvania, Winans came to Mississippi in 1810 and served as both a pastor on local circuits and the presiding elder in the Mississippi Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He was instrumental in the formation of the Methodist Episcopal Church–South. Winans died on August 31, 1857, and was buried in his family plot near Centerville in Wilkinson County.

The pewter communion set was made by Reed and Barton in Taunton, Massachusetts, ca. 1840–1850.

Source:  http://www.millsaps.edu/library/library_cain_winans.php

 

Artifacts: Can Labels

On July 30, 2013, in Artifacts, by Amanda
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Can label. Accession number: 1985.70.11 (2) Museum Division collection

Can label. Accession number: 1985.70.11 (2) Museum Division collection

Here are the final two can labels featuring Mississippi farmers and produce companies from the Museum Division collection.

Can label. Accession number: 1985.70.14 (Museum Division collection)

Can label. Accession number: 1985.70.14 (Museum Division collection)

 

Artifacts: More Crate Labels

On July 24, 2013, in Artifacts, by Amanda
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Crate label. Accession number: 1985.70.3 (Museum Division collection)

Crate label. Accession number: 1985.70.3 (Museum Division collection)

Here are several more crate and can labels that were used by turn-of-the-century farmers and produce companies to advertise their wares.

Can label. Accession number: 1985.70.8 (Museum Division collection)

Can label. Accession number: 1985.70.8 (Museum Division collection)

Can label. Accession number: 1985.70.9 (Museum Division collection)

Can label. Accession number: 1985.70.9 (Museum Division collection)

 

Artifacts: Crate and Can Labels

On July 16, 2013, in Artifacts, by Amanda
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Nan Prince, assistant director of collections, brings us this post in her ongoing series about neat artifacts in the Museum Division collection.

Crate label. Accession number: 1985.70.1 (Museum Division collection)

Crate label. Accession number: 1985.70.1 (Museum Division collection)

With advancements in transportation such as railroads and trucks in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, truck farming became increasingly popular in Mississippi. Farmers and produce companies used visually appealing labels on their crates and cans to both distinguish them from other products and to serve as an advertisement. Pictured here are several crate and can labels from various Mississippi produce and canning companies that are in the Museum Division collection.

Can label. Accession number: 1985.70.7 (Museum Division collection)

Can label. Accession number: 1985.70.7 (Museum Division collection)

Crate label. Accession number: 1985.70.2 (Museum Division collection)

Crate label. Accession number: 1985.70.2 (Museum Division collection)

 

Vicksburg Surrenders

On July 3, 2013, in Artifacts, by Amanda
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The Mississippi Civil War Sesquicentennial continues and in the coming months we will be highlighting Museum Division collections related to 1863 and the Civil War. Special thanks to Nan Prince, assistant director of collections, for writing this series.

July 4, 1863 – The Vicksburg Campaign: The Surrender of Vicksburg

1st National Confederate flag. Accession number: 2004.3.1 (Museum Division collection)

1st National Confederate flag. Accession number: 2004.3.1 (Museum Division collection)

President Abraham Lincoln called Vicksburg, Mississippi, “the key” to winning the Civil War, and General Ulysses S. Grant launched the Vicksburg Campaign in the spring of 1863. The campaign was a series of battles and maneuvers that led to the eventual siege and surrender of the Confederate stronghold on the Mississippi River.

General John Pemberton’s army in Vicksburg was worn down from Grant’s forty-seven day siege. Thousands of his soldiers were suffering from illness, wounds, and malnutrition; and supplies were dangerously low. Realizing that no relief would be coming from General Joseph Johnston and that he could negotiate better terms of surrender on Independence Day, Pemberton surrendered Vicksburg on July 4.

Pictured above is a 1st National Confederate flag taken by Samuel Loring Percival Ayres, second assistant engineer of the USS Pensacola, at Vicksburg on July 4, 1863. The flag was made by H. Cassidy, a prominent flag maker in New Orleans, and is 8 ½ feet long. Cassidy often made Confederate flags from old US flags, and he probably employed that technique with this flag.

Source: “Vicksburg Surrender,” Vicksburg National Military Park, National Park Service, http://www.nps.gov/vick/historyculture/surrender.htm.

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