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April

April 01, 2015

Wednesday, April 1, noon–1 p.m. at the William F. Winter Archives and History Building. As part of the History Is Lunch series, daniel johnson will present "Civil War Drawings from the Becker Collection," the special exhibit at the Mississippi Museum of Art. For more information call 601-576-6998 or email info@mdah.state.ms.us.

April 08, 2015

Wednesday, April 8, noon–1 p.m. at the William F. Winter Archives and History Building. As part of the History Is Lunch series, Nell Linton Knox and Ellen Rodgers Johnson will discuss their book Studio Jackson: Creative Culture in the Mississippi Capital. Sales and signing to follow. For more information call 601-576-6998 email info@mdah.state.ms.us.

Studio Jackson

In the capital city of Jackson, visual artists and craftsmen have historically found a place where their work is cherished as part of the local economy. The works span nearly all mediums from sculpting to painting. Beginning in the 1920s with the formation of Wolfe Studios and spanning decades of change and development, Jackson studios have emerged and reigned as the preeminent strongholds of economic development and creative culture in the capital city. Author Nell Linton Knox and photographer Ellen Rodgers Johnson capture the compelling narratives behind some of the well-known craftsmen whose studios are mainstays in Jackson’s oldest neighborhoods.

Nell Linton Knox studied English and classical studies at Millsaps College and holds a master’s degree in southern studies from the University of Mississippi. A Jackson, Mississippi native, Nell is a contributor to publications and organizations including Portico Magazine, Mississippi Encyclopedia, the Southern Foodways Alliance and the Mississippi Department of Archives and History. This is her first book.

Ellen Rodgers Johnson received her first camera, a hot-pink-and-lime-green Polaroid “Cool Cam,” at age seven. She recalls using the camera to photograph her toys; she was reprimanded for trying to sell the photos to friends at school. She majored in fine arts at Belhaven University in Jackson, Mississippi, with a concentration in photography. A Rolling Fork, Mississippi native, Ellen is currently based in Jackson, where she does commercial photography for a number of freelance clients, as well as portraiture. Ellen shows her fine art photography at Fischer Gallery in Jackson and M2 Gallery in Little Rock, Arkansas. This is her first book.

April 15, 2015

Lisa Todd - For a Voice and the VoteWednesday, April 15, noon–1 p.m. at the William F. Winter Archives and History Building. As part of the History Is Lunch series, Lisa Todd will discuss her book For a Voice and the Vote: My Journey with the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party. Sales and signing to follow. For more information call 601-576-6998 or email info@mdah.state.ms.us.

For a Voice and the Vote: My Journey with the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party is about Todd’s family, childhood, and her 1962 and 1963 summer experiences that reveal her motivation in joining the Mississippi Summer Project when she graduated from college in 1964. She describes the moderate community of Greenville where she was assigned for voter registration, including her fear, the families she lived with, her fellow volunteers, the young black staff, canvassing in black neighborhoods, precinct work for the new Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party (MFDP), the local MFDP county convention, and her sense of the Beloved Community.

The focus of the book is the MFDP Convention Challenge to unseat the all-white segregationist Mississippi Democratic Party delegates at the Democratic National Convention in Atlantic City at the end of August 1964, which she discusses as a participant-observer and from her research in primary and secondary sources. Only brief accounts have appeared in the history books to date. For a Voice and the Vote details the five days that began with Fannie Lou Hamer’s testimony to the credentials committee. The MFDP, represented by liberal Washington lawyer and political insider Joe Rauh and aided by Martin Luther King Jr., confronted President Lyndon Johnson, Hubert Humphrey, Walter Mondale, Walter Reuther, and others to gain voting rights and end racism in Mississippi and the Democratic Party.

 

April 22, 2015

Wednesday, April 22, noon–1 p.m. at the William F. Winter Archives and History Building. As part of the History Is Lunch series, Janis Dyson will present "Turning Clay into History: The Story of W.D. Suggs Pottery." Sales and signing to follow. For more information call 601-576-6998 or email info@mdah.state.ms.us.

April 29, 2015

Wednesday, April 29, noon–1 p.m. at the William F. Winter Archives and History Building. As part of the History Is Lunch series, Elise Winter will discuss Once in a Lifetime: Reflections of a Mississippi First Lady. Sales and signing to follow. For more information call 601-576-6998 or email info@mdah.state.ms.us.

May

May 06, 2015

Wednesday, May 6, noon–1 p.m. at the William F. Winter Archives and History Building. As part of the History Is Lunch series, Jackson native Katy Simpson Smith, author of The Story of Land and Sea, will present "Turning History into Fiction.” Sales and signing to follow. For more information call 601-576-6998 or email info@mdah.state.ms.us.

May 13, 2015

Wednesday, May 13, noon–1 p.m. at the William F. Winter Archives and History Building. As part of the History Is Lunch series, filmmaker Wilma Mosley Clopton will screen her new documentary Jessie: One Woman, One Vision: A Look at the Life of Dr. Jessie Bryant Mosley.  For more information call 601-576-6998 or email info@mdah.state.ms.us.