Skip to content

Series 353 consists of a printed booklet containing a Christmas day menu and camp roster for Civilian Conservation Corps Company 5415, which did forestry work at Camp F-5, located about fourteen miles south of New Augusta, Mississippi. The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) was one of several programs established by the United States government to alleviate joblessness caused by the Great Depression. Originally established in 1933 as the Emergency Conservation Work Program, it did not gain its title of Civilian Conservation Corps until 1937. The CCC was a quasi-military organization that employed jobless young men to perform conservation work such as planting trees, fighting wildfires, controlling erosion, erecting dams, and other such activities. The men lived in camps, and a majority of their pay was sent directly to their families each month for their support, while the CCC provided the men with food, clothing, and medical care, as well as limited job training and educational opportunities. Roughly 3,000,000 Americans enrolled in the CCC program during its nine years of existence. More than 40,000 of them were Mississippians.