Mississippi Department of Archives and History
 

Grants

 

Nearly $60,000 Awarded through CLG Grant Program

The Department of Archives and History has awarded grants totaling more than $58,000 to fourteen preservation projects in Certified Local Government communities across the state. Amounts range from $1,250 for a survey of Osyka's historic resources to more than $7,500 for the cleaning and stabilization of a Mississippi Landmark school building in Hattiesburg.

"The Department of Archives and History is pleased to be able to assist these worthy projects," said Historic Preservation Division director Ken P'Pool. "We only regret we could not fully fund all of the requests."

The Certified Local Government program is a federal-state-local partnership designed to assist communities in dealing with diverse preservation needs through funding and technical assistance. CLG communities may apply for annual grants to undertake preservation projects of importance to the community. Grants may be used for such diverse projects as the restoration of historic buildings; historical, architectural, or archaeological site inventory work; preparation of nominations to the National Register of Historic Places; educational programs; and staff support for new historic preservation commissions.

Funding for the grants comes from the Historic Preservation Fund, a federal grants program appropriated by the U.S. Congress and administered by the National Park Service, which provides financial support to State Historic Preservation Offices-in Mississippi the Historic Preservation Division of MDAH.

Grant awards are as follows:

Aberdeen, $5,000, for the further stabilization of the M&O Depot.

Blue Mountain, $1,500, for a survey of historic resources in Blue Mountain and the preparation of National Register of Historic Places nominations.

Carrollton, $2,403.50, for the restoration of the first-floor fašade of the circa 1899 Carrollton Masonic Lodge.

Clarksdale, $5,000, to complete a historic resource inventory survey (begun with a FY06 CLG grant) and a National Register district nomination.

Cleveland, $2,250, for the hiring of a consultant to create custom design review guidelines for the residential historic district.

Hattiesburg, $7,561.50, for the cleaning and stabilization of the endangered Eaton School.

Indianola, $3,000, for the preparation of a National Register of Historic Places district nomination.

Kosciusko, $6,500, for the preparation of a National Register of Historic Places district nomination for the downtown area and the development of custom design review guidelines.

Meridian, $2,500, for the creation of a Historic Resources map layer and database for each of the resources in the Meridian Downtown Historic Preservation District.

Osyka, $1,250, for a survey of historic resources and the preparation of National Register of Historic Places nominations

Vaiden, $7,500, for the preparation of an assessment of the structural condition of the Old Vaiden High School—a Mississippi Landmark—including site survey, drawings of the floor plans and elevations, and an analytical report assessing the structure's condition and viability for re-use.

West Point, $6,000, for the preparation of a survey of areas adjacent to the city's historic district and the amending of three of the oldest National Register districts in West Point.

Winona, $5,000, to repair the roof, gutters, and downspouts of the Winona Community House, a Mississippi Landmark.

Woodville, $2,600, for the repair and painting of all exterior wooden elements and the reglazing and repainting of all windows of the Woodville Oddfellows Lodge.

To become a CLG, a community must adopt a preservation ordinance establishing a preservation commission in accordance with federal and state guidelines. Once the commission has been established, application for CLG status may be made to the National Park Service through the Department of Archives and History. MDAH works closely with local government officials and citizens to help them create and manage a workable local historic preservation program. To learn more about the CLG program, contact Todd Sanders in the Historic Preservation Division of MDAH, 601-576-6950.

The fifty-one CLG communities in Mississippi are Aberdeen, Amory, Baldwyn, Biloxi, Blue Mountain, Brandon, Canton, Carrollton, Centreville, Claiborne County, Clarksdale, Cleveland, Columbia, Columbus, Como, Corinth, Eupora, Friars Point, Greenwood, Hattiesburg, Hernando, Holly Springs, Indianola, Jackson, Kosciusko, Laurel, Leland, Lexington, Louisville, Magnolia, McComb, Meridian, Mound Bayou, Natchez, Newton, Ocean Springs, Osyka, Oxford, Pascagoula, Philadelphia, Port Gibson, Raymond, Ripley, Tunica, Tupelo, Vaiden, Vicksburg, West, Winona, Woodville and Yazoo City.


 

$8.3 Million Awarded in Third Round of Hurricane Grants

The Mississippi Department of Archives and History has awarded $8.3 million to 112 applicants in the third round of the Hurricane Relief Grant Program for Historic Preservation. The grants will be used to repair and restore historically significant structures, both publicly and privately owned, that suffered hurricane damage. The total amount awarded thus far through the grant program is more than $21 million.

The Board of Trustees of the Department of Archives and History determined the grant recipients at a meeting on April 20 in Jackson. The Hurricane Relief Grant Program for Historic Preservation is federally funded through the National Park Service and the Department of the Interior; the program will distribute $26 million to properties damaged by Hurricane Katrina. Only properties not eligible for FEMA assistance are eligible for awards from the Hurricane Relief Grant Program for Historic Preservation Hurricane.

"We will review late applications and applications already submitted until all available funding is exhausted," said Chelius H. Carter, director of the MDAH Gulf Coast Field Office.

The grant awards, organized by city, are as follows:

Bay Saint Louis
Niolet House, 298 South 2nd Street–$32,000
Rivendale, 414 3rd Street–$16,000
The Webb School, 300 3rd Street–$20,000
Fineran House, 410 3rd Street–$15,000
Bowman House, 106 Bay View Court–$35,000
Scafide Property, 398 Blaize Avenue–$150,000
Kingston House, 404 Bookter Street–$75,000
Bowling House, 126 Carroll Avenue–$30,000
Barrouse House, 204 Carroll Avenue–$32,000
Molinary House, 325 Carroll Avenue–$35,000
Gager House, 326 Carroll Avenue–$60,000
Olde Town Library, 123 Court Street–$75,000
McDonald Realty Company, 125 Court Street–$50,000
Haas House, 433 deMontluzin–$30,000
Alexander House, 316 Easterbrook Street–$15,000
Jensen House, 317 Easterbrook Street–$50,000
Evans House, 406 Hancock Street–$10,000
Schroeder House, 315 Leonhard Street–$50,000
Jones House, 516 Main Street–$15,000
532 Main Street–$35,000
Echo Building, 200 North Beach–$125,000
Dickinson Main House, 224 North Beach Boulevard–$135,000
Dickinson Slave Quarters, 224 North Beach Boulevard–$35,000
Cooper House, 129 Railroad Avenue–$20,000
Kelly House, 311 St. George Street–$100,000
Roth House, 312 St. George Street–$15,000
Curry House, 403 St. George Street–$17,500
Mims House, 315 State Street–$25,000
West House, 502 State Street–$25,000
Wilder House, 224 Sycamore–$12,000
Pursell House, 201 Union Street–$22,000
Tucker House, 232 Washington Street–$25,000
Morrow House, 234 Washington Street–$10,000
Leatrice Cain House, 440 Washington Street–$50,000

Biloxi
Thompson House, 1506 Avalon Drive–$75,000
Beauvoir, 2244 Beach Boulevard–$1,038,000
Mallard–Duckett House, 158 Benachi–$43,633
Medical Office of Dr. Gilbert R. Mason, 670 Division Street–$64,500
Hansen House, 112 Edgewater Drive–$125,000
Gruich House, 1295 Kensington Drive–$50,000
Bradley House, 635 Lameuse Street–$50,000
Sugar House, 132 Morrison–$25,000
Rider House, 144 Seal Avenue–$25,000
Suter House, 1012 Tullier Court–$10,000

Brookhaven
Cedar Hills Farm, 1271 Antique Lane–$137,000
Hardy House, 205 Natchez Avenue–$110,000

D'Iberville
Shannon Stein House, 9469 Central Avenue–$80,000

Gulfport
Barrett/Conerly House, 630 2nd Street–$125,000
Robinson Mayer House, 1024 2nd Street–$50,000
Dauro House, 1130 2nd Street–$100,000
Robinson House, 1315 2nd Street–$75,000
Cericola Residence, 1417 2nd Street–$125,000
Simpson House, 1632 2nd Street–$15,000
3214 11th Street–$140,000
3218 11th Street–$140,000
Mississippi Sound Historical Museum, 2425 13th Street–$127,900
Gulfport City Hall, 2309 15th Street–$249,784
Russo House, 1511 19th Avenue–$15,000
Netterville House, 1513 19th Avenue–$35,000
Yoste Residence, 1514 19th Avenue–$30,000
Cecille McClellan House, 1541 19th Street–$10,000
Soria City Lodge #542, 1438 20th Street–$75,000
Quince House, 1618 20th Street–$10,000
1607 21st Street–$24,997
1609 21st Street–$24,997
Gracious, 1912 23rd Avenue–$25,000
William H. Hardy Building, 1410 24th Avenue–$289,000
Lee Home, 1201 32nd Avenue–$35,000
1215 36th Avenue–$25,000
909 38th Avenue–$60,000
West Side Park Home, 817 39th Avenue–$110,000
Underwood Residence, 900 40th Avenue–$17,000
Parkerson House, 3007 50th Avenue–$50,000
1910 Bullis Avenue–$21,500
1912 Bullis Avenue–$14,000
8275 Georgia Avenue–$75,600
2817 Martin Luther King Boulevard–$55,000
Ben Abram Home, 14279 Rippy Road–$75,000
Joshua White Home, 14289 Rippy Road–$40,000
14332 Rippy Road–$24,997
Martha Snelling House, 14336 Rippy Road–$24,997
Donald Fairley House, 14357 Rippy Road–$25,000
Heritage Home, 14439 Rippy Road–$110,000

Hattiesburg
Forrest County Courthouse, 630 Main Street–$45,000

Long Beach
Hancock Bank Building, 126 Jeff Davis Avenue–$150,000

Lumberton
Old Cash and Carry, 316 West Main Street–$150,000

McHenry
George Austin McHenry House, 86 McHenry Avenue–$75,000

Ocean Springs
Mary C. O'Keefe Cultural Center, 1600 Government Street–$100,000
Ocean Springs Community Center, 512 Washington Avenue–$57,000
Ocean Springs Senior Citizen Center, 514 Washington Avenue–$10,000

Pascagoula
DeJean House, 3603 Frederick Street North–$80,000
Bill Thomas House, 819 Jackson Avenue–$15,000
Laura Westphal House, 711 Krebs Avenue–$55,000
Minkler House, 704 Mill Road–$60,000
Manning House, 1714 Parsley–$50,000
Borho House, 4215 Pine Street–$12,000
Robbins House, 1101 Polk Avenue–$75,000
Moore House, 1403 Roosevelt–$45,000
Eugene Gautier House, 3803 Willow–$20,000

Pass Christian
Watson House, 974 East 2nd Street–$15,000
976 East 2nd Street–$10,000
Tarpon–Beacon Newspaper Office, 226 Davis Avenue–$150,000
Moseley Carriage House, 855 East Scenic Drive–$40,000
Sherman's Castle, 1012 West Beach Boulevard–$150,000

Pearlington
Brogan House, 16634 Whites Road–$25,000

Poplarville
Shaw Homestead, 1214 Barth Road–$30,000
President's House, Pearl River Community College, 101 Highway 11 North–$20,000

Saucier
Shaw House, 23057 Riceville Road–$10,000

Sumrall
Sumrall Courtroom and Jail, 39 Pine Street–$60,000

Tylertown
Walthall County Training School, 181 Ginntown Road–$64,350
Mt. Moriah School, 149 Mt. Moriah Road–$55,000

Waveland
Waveland Civic Center, 335 Coleman Avenue–$1,000,000

The Department of Archives and History is the official State Historic Preservation Office in Mississippi and handles all requests for National Register information and assistance. Congress established the National Register of Historic Places in 1966 as a list of federally recognized properties especially worthy of protection and preservation. Mississippi has more than 1200 National Register entries, including archaeological sites, battlefields, bridges, buildings, cemeteries, forts, houses, and historic districts.

The Mississippi Department of Archives and History is the second-oldest state department of archives and history in the United States. A comprehensive historical agency, the department collects, preserves, and provides access to the archival resources of the state, administers various museums and historic sites, and oversees statewide programs for historic preservation, government records management, and publications. The department is headquartered in the state-of-the-art William F. Winter Archives and History Building, located on the corner of North and Amite Streets in downtown Jackson. For more information call 601-576-6850 or see the Web site, www.mdah.state.ms.us.


 

$6.2M Awarded to Historic Properties Damaged by Katrina

The Mississippi Department of Archives and History has awarded $6.278 million to 115 applicants in the second round of the Hurricane Relief Grant Program for Historic Preservation. The grants will be used to repair and restore historically significant structures, both publicly and privately owned, that suffered hurricane damage. The total amount awarded thus far through the grant program is more than $13 million.

The Board of Trustees of the Department of Archives and History determined the grant recipients at a special meeting on February 16 in Jackson. The deadline for submission of applications for the third round of grants is April 6, 2007, and grants will be awarded at a meeting on April 20, 2007. Applicants from the first and second rounds who have not received official notice of ineligibility will automatically be considered in future rounds. The Hurricane Relief Grant Program for Historic Preservation is federally funded through the National Park Service and the Department of the Interior; the program will distribute $26 million to properties damaged by Hurricane Katrina.

"This program has been invaluable in helping property owners repair their homes and businesses and remain on the Gulf Coast," said MDAH director H.T. Holmes. "We encourage all owners of qualifying historic structures to apply."

The grant awards, organized by city, are as follows:

Bay Saint Louis
Michel-Reid House, 241 Ballentine—$110,000
Kirk House, 400 Blaize—$35,000
Lusich's Department Store Building, 406 Blaize—$10,000
Pitalla's Grocery, 403 Blaize—$45,000
Breath-Coffer Cottage, 4 Breath Lane—$35,000
Breath House, 6 Breath Lane—$40,000
Kergosien House, 109 Carroll—$100,000
Stone House, 308 Carroll—$110,000
Ladner Seafood, 508 Hancock—$10,000
Chevis House, 409 Hancock—$20,000
Keller House, 209 Keller—$20,000
Farnet House, 347 Main—$35,000
Magnolia State Supply Co. Building, 111 Main—$150,000
Collins-Panks House, 136 Main—$12,000
Carmichael House, 146 Main—$30,000
Hancock County Courthouse, 150 Main—$194,500
Boxx Cabinet Shop, 216 Main—$15,000
Carroll House, 308 Main—$20,000
Schnur House, 339 Main—$10,000
Strickler House, 403 Main—$15,000
Phillips/Toulme House, 222 North Beach—$150,000
The Little White Cottage, 506 North Beach—$60,000
Lazy Y Stables, 10269 Old Nicholson—$40,000
Ladner House, 209 St. Charles—$20,000
Gouguet House, 303 St. George—$40,000
Stephenson House, 306 St. George—$25,000
Curry House, 317 St. George—$20,000
Guillory House, 314 St. John—$15,000
Jensen House, 312 St. John—$10,000
Tusa House, 127 State—$22,000
410 State Street—$28,000
Mary White House, 253 Sycamore—$25,000
Asher House, 124 Ulman—$10,000
Merrill House, 204 Union—$30,000
Edwards/McDonald House, 119 Washington—$150,000
MacAniff House, 241 Washington—$20,000
Magee House, 419 Webster—$25,000

Biloxi
L.N. Dantzler House, 1332 Beach—$30,000
183 Claiborne—$30,000
Vincent House, 190 Crawford Street—$10,000
Punzo House, 185 Dorries—$65,000
Punzo House, 191 Dorries—$50,000
Johnson Guest House, 189 Hopkins—$25,000
Blanchard House, 566 Howard—$75,000
Lopez House, 579 Howard—$15,000
Griswold House, 583 Howard—$75,000
Butcher/Blanchard House, 168 Lee—$25,000
House House, 184 Lee—$25,000
Creel House, 370 Meaut—$85,000
Brunet—Fourchy House (Mary Mahoney's), 116 Rue Magnolia—$25,000
Baker House, 133 Seal—$110,000
Welter House, 135 Seal—$10,000

Gautier
Westside, 222 Graveline—$17,000

Gulfport
Coari House, 3608 10th St.—$30,000
Garrity House, 3500 11th St.—$110,000
Smith House, 1918 15th St.—$70,000
Oak Shadows, 2111 19th Ave.—$25,000
Ann Anderson House, 1625 22nd Ave.—$28,000
Gannon House, 2110 22nd Ave.—$28,000
Salloum House, 1136 2nd St.—$125,000
Whaley House, 1715 31st Ave.—$50,000
Terrell House, 1223 33rd Ave.—$20,000
Hastings House, 903 38th Ave.—$25,000
Hemingway Cottage, 914 39th Ave.—$75,000
Beulah Church/Cemetery Association, 14322 Beulah Church Rd.—$15,000
Garcia House, 58 Railroad St. E.—$40,000
Lewis House, 4604 Railroad St. W.—$10,000
Benton House, 14115 Rippy Rd.—$125,000
St. Martin House, 700 Tegarden—$15,000
Andre House, 623 Woodward—$22,000

Long Beach
Cornell House, 134 Beach Park Place—$30,000

Lucedale
Lucedale Colored School, 119 Love St.—$110,000

Meridian
Soule Steam Feed Works, 402 19th Ave.—$110,000

Moss Point
Tanner House, 4500 Elder—$20,000

Ocean Springs
Green House, 13801 Arbor Circle—$150,000
Duckett House, 914 Calhoun—$30,000
Duckett House, 918 Calhoun—$27,732
Thetford House, 908 Calhoun—$25,000
Many Oaks, 315 Front Beach—$100,000
Twelve Oaks, 1112 Hanley—$15,000
Ross House, 522 Jackson—$10,000
Attaya House, 422 Martin—$110,000
Madison Railroad Cottage, 1313 Robinson—$20,000

Pascagoula
Gallahue House, 610 Bienville—$50,000
Grant House, 903 Grant—$70,000
Pascagoula National Bank, 525 Krebs—$15,000
M.A. Dees Tract Subdivision, 1103 Krebs—$35,000
Gates House, 1402 Mantou—$10,000
Capt. C.H. Bugge House, 523 Orange—$25,000
Pascagoula High School Auditorium, 2903 Pascagoula—$300,000
Young House, 4011 Pine—$11,000
Leonard Levin House, 1403 Washington—$55,000

Pass Christian
Arcadia, 24170 Arcadia—$34,373
Randolph School, 315 Clark—$499,377
Katherine Campbell House, 124 Davis—$75,000
Wagar Property, 207 E. Scenic—$121,670
Slave Quarters, 623 E. Scenic—$35,000
MacDiarmid House, 607 E. Scenic—$51,126
Koerner House, 801 E. Scenic—$75,000
Blass House, 905 E. Scenic—$25,000
Quinn House, 744 E. 2nd St.—$50,000
Althea Johnson House, 451 E. 2nd St.—$110,000
Bourdin House, 535 E. 2nd St.—$25,000
Edwards House, 501 Espy—$50,000
Pannell House, 25224 LeChene—$50,000

Pearlington
Edwards House, 5098 Hwy. 604—$60,000

Poplarville
Burge House, 1002 Maxwell—$20,000

Saucier
Pierce House, 17285 Old Hwy. 49—$10,000

Vancleave
Dr. Samuel Rankin Ratliff Cottage, 4811 Ratliff—$75,000

Waveland
Waveland Cottage, 506 E. 5th St.—$110,000
Ullman Mill House, 500 Nicholson—$50,000
Davis House, 913 Sears—$35,000
Ferry House, 613 St. Joseph—$45,000
Zitsmann House, 1501 Waveland—$50,000

Properties in the Mississippi Gulf Coast National Heritage Area-George, Hancock, Harrison, Jackson, Pearl River, and Stone Counties-are given preference when applying for grants, as specified by the federal government. Any private property owner, unit of state or local government, or nonprofit organization (excepting active religious organizations) may submit a grant application to protect, stabilize, preserve, restore, or rehabilitate a property that is listed or eligible to be listed in the National Register of Historic Places and that was damaged by Hurricanes Katrina or Rita.

Funds will be available through December 31, 2008, on a competitive basis. Guidelines and applications for the Hurricane Relief Grant Program for Historic Preservation are available on the department's Web site, www.mdah.state.ms.us, by emailing preservationhouse@mdah.state.ms.us, or by calling 228-435-1180 or 601-576-6940.

The Department of Archives and History is the official State Historic Preservation Office in Mississippi and handles all requests for National Register information and assistance. Congress established the National Register of Historic Places in 1966 as a list of federally recognized properties especially worthy of protection and preservation. Mississippi has more than 1200 National Register entries, including archaeological sites, battlefields, bridges, buildings, cemeteries, forts, houses, and historic districts.

The Mississippi Department of Archives and History is the second-oldest state department of archives and history in the United States. A comprehensive historical agency, the department collects, preserves, and provides access to the archival resources of the state, administers various museums and historic sites, and oversees statewide programs for historic preservation, government records management, and publications. The department is headquartered in the state-of-the-art William F. Winter Archives and History Building, located on the corner of North and Amite Streets in downtown Jackson. For more information call 601-576-6850.


 

Archaeological Grants Awarded in New Program

The Mississippi Department of Archives and History has awarded nearly $25,000 to seven projects in the first year of the Mississippi Archaeological Research Grant Program. The largest single grant, almost $10,000, will fund excavations at a mound center in Warren County.

The University of Alabama was awarded $9,846 for their project "The Glass Site: An Investigation of Plaquemine Culture Architecture." The Glass site is a part of the relatively understudied northern portion of the Natchez Bluffs. The project will provide detailed mound architectural data from the Plaquemine period, A.D. 1200-1650. Excavations are scheduled to be completed in July of 2007, with final findings published in summer of 2008.

A grant of $5,070 was awarded to Washington University in St. Louis to conduct a search for the remains of Native American settlements along Deer Creek in Washington County and create a database of the sites.

The University of Southern Mississippi was awarded three grants. The largest grant of $5,000 will be used to conduct a survey of the Moran site, an eighteenth-century cemetery in Biloxi badly damaged by Hurricane Katrina. The project will use DNA testing to determine gender, ethnicity, and medical conditions of the bodies interred there. A $1,440 grant will be used to chart changes in Native Americans' cultivation practices through deer bone analysis, and a $1,000 grant will go to complete a database of bioarchaeological studies of skeletal series.

Mississippi State University received two grants, $1,200 for radiocarbon dating at an Oktibbeha County site, and $900 to conduct analysis on a deer bone from a Choctaw site in Neshoba County.

"Each of these seven projects will make a significant contribution to our understanding of the history of Mississippi." said Pamela Edwards Lieb, MDAH chief archaeologist. 'We had a great response to this program and hope to continue to support this important work in the future."

The Mississippi Department of Archives and History is the second-oldest state department of archives and history in the United States. A comprehensive historical agency, the department collects, preserves, and provides access to the archival resources of the state, administers various museums and historic sites, and oversees statewide programs for historic preservation, government records management, and publications. The department is headquartered in the state-of-the-art William F. Winter Archives and History Building, located on the corner of North and Amite Streets in downtown Jackson. For more information call 601-576-6850.


 

$6.4 M Awarded to Historic Properties Damaged by Katrina

The Mississippi Department of Archives and History has awarded more than $6.4 million to fifty-seven applicants in the first round of the Hurricane Relief Grant Program for Historic Preservation. The grants will be used to repair and restore historically significant structures, both publicly and privately owned, that suffered hurricane damage.

The Board of Trustees of the Department of Archives and History determined the grant recipients at a special meeting on December 15 in Jackson. The deadline for submission of applications for the second round of grants is January 19, 2007, and grants will be awarded at a meeting on February 16, 2007. Most applicants who did not receive funding in the first round will automatically be eligible for consideration in future rounds. The Hurricane Relief Grant Program for Historic Preservation is federally funded through the National Park Service and the Department of the Interior; the program will distribute $26 million to properties damaged by Hurricane Katrina.

"These grants will allow many homeowners, businesses, and public facilities to restore their properties and remain on the Mississippi Gulf Coast," said MDAH director H.T. Holmes. "We encourage all owners of qualifying historic structures to apply."

The grant awards, organized by city, are as follows:

Bay Saint Louis
Al Kingston's Barbershop, 102 Blaize—$30,000
Williams House, 302 Carroll—$75,000
Alford House, 304 Carroll—$124,000
Baria House, 218 Keller—$50,000
Seagerson House, 207 Main—$40,000
Gabled Cottage, 209 Main—$40,000
Capdepon Honeymoon Cottage, 209 Main—$40,000
Mauffrey House, 210 Main—$75,000
Capdepon House, 211 Main—$40,000
Velardi—Strohmetz House, 335 Main—$15,000
Waterman House, 143 St. Charles—$80,000
Allenback House, 115 Sycamore—$100,000
Kea House, 219 Sycamore—$40,000
Findley House, 251 Sycamore—$85,000
One Hundred Man Association Building, 303 Union—$110,000
Aniskovich/Navarro House, 115 Washington—$50,000
Iceman's Old Schoolhouse, 247 Washington—$75,000

Biloxi
Swetman House, 1210 Beach Boulevard—$150,000
John Sweatman House, 567 Howard—$125,000
Bond—Grant House, 932 Howard—$400,000
Barq's House, 208 Lameuse—$9,000
Bledsoe House, 168 St. Paul—$30,000

Gautier
Oldfields, 1901 Watersedge—$110,000

Gulfport
Nievas House, 1234 Second St.—$55,000
Harrison House, 1628 Second St.—$125,000
Rectitude Masonic Lodge, 1905 32nd Ave.—$150,000
Hastings House, 903 38th Ave.—$50,000
Revon House, 3820 Ninth St.—$60,000
McDaniel House, 1828 Beach Blvd.—$150,000
Dantzler House, 1238 E. Beach Blvd—$150,000

Hattiesburg
Old Hattiesburg High School, Main St.—$1,000,000

Long Beach
Oakhaven, 822 E. Beach—$150,000

Ocean Springs
Duckett House, 918 Calhoun—$47,268
Charnley Guest House, 507 E. Beach—$150,000
Charnley House, 509 E. Beach—$150,000
Sheehan House, 420 Main—$110,000
Walter Anderson House, 102 Shearwater—$150,000
Carter—Callaway House (Steamboat House), 916 State St.—$150,000
McFarland Cottage, 317 Washington—$50,000

Pascagoula
Captain Colle Beach House, 1309 Beach Blvd.—$110,000
Longfellow House, 3401 Beach Blvd.—$110,000
McIlwain House, 715 Columbus—$60,000
Krebs Manor, 3604 Magnolia—$150,000
Mayor Ebb Ford House, 3434 Pascagoula—$65,000
Nelson Tenement, 3615 Pine—$65,000

Pass Christian
Adams House, 316 Davis—$125,000
Henderson-Gildersleeve House, 1001 E. Beach—$150,000
Schaeffer House, 513 E. Scenic—150,000
Michelli House, 613 E. Scenic—150,000
Aschaffenburg—Loesch House, 625 E. Scenic—$149,999
Villa Karma, 961 E. Scenic—$60,000
Creole Cottage, 248 E. Second—$100,000
Shelter Oak Cottage, 543 E. Second—$100,000

Pearlington
Edwards House, 5098 Hwy 604—$50,000

Perkinston
Parker Farm Cottage, 163 Howard Parker Rd.—$75,000

Waveland
Collins House, 316 Hargett—$75,000
Favre House, 318 Jeff Davis—$75,000

Properties in the Mississippi Gulf Coast National Heritage Area-George, Hancock, Harrison, Jackson, Pearl River, and Stone Counties-are given preference when applying for grants, as specified by the federal government. Any private property owner, unit of state or local government, or nonprofit organization (excepting active religious organizations) may submit a grant application to protect, stabilize, preserve, restore, or rehabilitate a property that is listed or eligible to be listed in the National Register of Historic Places and that was damaged by Hurricanes Katrina or Rita.

Funds will be available through December 31, 2008, on a competitive basis. Guidelines and applications for the Hurricane Relief Grant Program for Historic Preservation are available on the department's Web site, www.mdah.state.ms.us, by emailing preservationhouse@mdah.state.ms.us, or by calling 228-435-1180 or 601-576-6940.

The Department of Archives and History is the official State Historic Preservation Office in Mississippi and handles all requests for National Register information and assistance. Congress established the National Register of Historic Places in 1966 as a list of federally recognized properties especially worthy of protection and preservation. Mississippi has more than 1200 National Register entries, including archaeological sites, battlefields, bridges, buildings, cemeteries, forts, houses, and historic districts.

The Mississippi Department of Archives and History is the second-oldest state department of archives and history in the United States. A comprehensive historical agency, the department collects, preserves, and provides access to the archival resources of the state, administers various museums and historic sites, and oversees statewide programs for historic preservation, government records management, and publications. The department is headquartered in the state-of-the-art William F. Winter Archives and History Building, located on the corner of North and Amite Streets in downtown Jackson. For more information call 601-576-6850.


 

2006 Community Heritage Grant Award Winners Announced

Thirty-two preservation and restoration projects from Corinth to the Gulf Coast have been awarded nearly $4 million in the fifth year of a grant program administered by the Mississippi Department of Archives and History. The Community Heritage Preservation grant program, authorized and funded through the Mississippi Legislature, helps preserve and restore historic courthouses and schools and, in Certified Local Government communities, other historic properties.

Twenty-nine of the thirty-two properties are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The Department of Archives and History received sixty-seven applications. Over the life of the program the department has awarded more than $22 million in Community Heritage Preservation grants to 121 projects.

"This program has been crucial in preserving historic structures across the state, and we are grateful to the Legislature for continuing to fund it," said H.T. Holmes, director of the Department of Archives and History. "The response from the public has been overwhelming, and we only regret that we could not have funded more of these worthy projects."

The grant awards are as follows:

Natchez on Top of the Hill Conflagration Interpretive Center, Natchez—$50,000
For exterior stabilization and masonry repair

Washington School Auditorium, Washington—$200,000
For exterior restoration and roof replacement

Old Corinth High School, Corinth—$180,000
For interior restoration and electrical work

Carroll County Courthouse, Carrollton—$6,800
For an architectural survey

Carrollton Masonic Lodge, Carrollton—$12,000
For exterior repairs, including roof replacement and wood repairs

Choctaw County Courthouse, Ackerman—$169,200
For exterior restoration, including window replacement and installation of an HVAC system

Clarke County Courthouse, Quitman—$160,000
For mechanical replacement

Old West Clay Agricultural High School, Pheba—$71,600
For exterior restoration and roof replacement

Delta Blues Museum, Clarksdale—$46,400
For exterior restoration and interior rehabilitation, including roof replacement, wood trim repair, and installation of a fire suppression system

Old Hattiesburg High School, Hattiesburg—$500,000
For exterior restoration, including masonry repair, window and door restoration, and asbestos abatement

George County Courthouse, Lucedale—$155,000
For interior rehabilitation, including a restoration of the courtroom

Boyd House (Oaks House Museum), Jackson—$41,600
For archaeological survey

Prentiss Institute Rosenwald School, Prentiss—$190,000
For exterior and interior restoration, including window and door restoration, floor and ceiling restoration, and electrical and mechanical work

Stewart M. Jones Middle School, Laurel—$158,000
For exterior restoration, including restoration of cast stone

Lafayette County Courthouse, Oxford—$168,000
For exterior and interior rehabilitation, including window restoration and plumbing work

Lawrence County Courthouse, Monticello—$66,422
For exterior restoration, including roof repair and window and door restoration

Old Canton High School, Canton—$220,000
For exterior restoration, including masonry restoration

Old First Presbyterian Church, Holly Springs—$11,000
For interior and exterior restoration, including roof repair, plumbing and electrical work, painting, and floor replacement

Byhalia School House, Byhalia—$74,000
For exterior restoration, including roof replacement and restoration of the front entrance

The Magnolias, Aberdeen—$20,000
For replacement of handicapped lift

Monroe County Courthouse, Aberdeen—$855,000
For interior and exterior restoration, including a restoration of the courtroom

Immanuel Church, Winona—$75,000For exterior restoration, including roof replacement

Pearl River County Courthouse, Poplarville—$13,400
For architectural survey

Smith County Courthouse, Raleigh—$29,000
For exterior restoration, including window restoration and the installation of storm windows

Drew Rosenwald School, Drew—$146,000
For exterior and interior restoration, including masonry and roof repair and window and floor restoration

Tallahatchie County Courthouse, Sumner—$36,600
For architectural survey

Old Tishomingo County Courthouse, Iuka—$35,000
For roof replacement

Old Midway School, Midway—$25,000
For exterior and interior renovation, including an engineering survey, wall restoration, and electrical upgrades

Walthall County Courthouse, Tylertown—$107,000
For exterior and interior restoration, including roof replacement, gutter, window, plaster, and floor repair, and the replacement of an ADA ramp

Levee Street Depot (Vicksburg Transportation Museum), Vicksburg—$59,200
For relocation and installation of tracks

Eupora High School, Eupora—$88,000
For exterior restoration, including restoration of windows

Old Pine Valley School, Pine Valley—$32,000
For exterior and interior restoration, including roof and foundation repair and window and door restoration

The Board of Trustees of the Department of Archives and History determined the grant recipients at a special meeting on December 15. In evaluating the grants the board attempted to balance the geographical distribution of the awards. Grant awards are paid on a reimbursable basis upon the successful completion of the entire project or at the time of the completion of pre-established phases of the project. A cash match of at least 20 percent must be provided, and prior to application all buildings must have been designated Mississippi Landmarks. Only county or municipal governments, school districts, and nonprofit organizations granted Section 501 (c)(3) tax-exempt status by the Internal Revenue Service may submit applications. In reviewing and evaluating the grants, the Board of Trustees of MDAH attempted to balance the geographical distribution of grant awards.

To become a Certified Local Government, a community must adopt a preservation ordinance establishing a preservation commission in accordance with federal and state guidelines. Once the commission has been established, application for CLG status may be made to the National Park Service through the Department of Archives and History. MDAH works closely with local government officials and citizens to help them create and manage a workable local historic preservation program. To learn more about the CLG program, contact Todd Sanders in the Historic Preservation Division of MDAH, 601-576-6950.

The forty-nine CLG communities in Mississippi are Aberdeen, Amory, Baldwyn, Biloxi, Blue Mountain, Brandon, Canton, Carrollton, Centreville, Claiborne County, Clarksdale, Cleveland, Columbia, Columbus, Como, Corinth, Eupora, Friars Point, Greenwood, Hattiesburg, Hernando, Holly Springs, Indianola, Jackson, Kosciusko, Laurel, Leland, Lexington, Louisville, McComb, Meridian, Mound Bayou, Natchez, Ocean Springs, Oxford, Osyka, Pascagoula, Philadelphia, Port Gibson, Raymond, Ripley, Tunica, Tupelo, Vaiden, Vicksburg, West, Winona, Woodville, and Yazoo City.

The Mississippi Department of Archives and History is the second-oldest state department of archives and history in the United States. A comprehensive historical agency, the department collects, preserves, and provides access to the archival resources of the state, administers various museums and historic sites, and oversees statewide programs for historic preservation, government records management, and publications. The department is headquartered in the state-of-the-art William F. Winter Archives and History Building, located on the corner of North and Amite Streets in downtown Jackson. For more information call 601-576-6850.


 

$26M in Grants for Hurricane-Damaged Historic Properties

The Mississippi Department of Archives and History is administering a new federal grant program that will distribute $26 million for properties along the Gulf Coast affected by Hurricane Katrina. The grants are available for publicly or privately owned structures listed or eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places.

HT Holmes, director, Mississippi Department of Archives and History"The Hurricane Relief Grant Program for Historic Preservation will be of tremendous benefit to private homeowners of hurricane-damaged historic properties," said Mississippi Department of Archives and History director H.T. Holmes. "These funds will support the Gulf Coast's commitment to preserve its rich architectural and cultural history."

To more efficiently manage the program, MDAH is opening a field office in Biloxi at Preservation House. MDAH staff will help prepare and submit grant applications and offer comprehensive grant management for most recipients-from the preparation of building documents to construction oversight.

Funds will be available through December 31, 2008, on a competitive basis. The MDAH Board of Trustees will consider the first round of applications at a special board meeting on December 8 in Jackson. Meetings will be scheduled for January and April 2007 to award subsequent rounds of grants. Guidelines and applications for the Hurricane Relief Grant Program for Historic Preservation are available for downloading below, by emailing the new field office, or by calling 228-435-1180 or 601-576-6940.

HT Holmes, director, Mississippi Department of Archives and History"We encourage all owners of historic structures damaged by Hurricane Katrina to check the department's Web site for information on this program," said MDAH Historic Preservation Division director Ken P'Pool. "These grants may be used to cover many activities not eligible for other types of government grant assistance."

Properties in the Mississippi Gulf Coast National Heritage Area-George, Hancock, Harrison, Jackson, Pearl River, and Stone Counties-will be given preference when applying for grants, as specified by the federal government. Any private property owner, unit of state or local government, or nonprofit organization (excepting active religious organizations) may submit a grant application to protect, stabilize, preserve, restore, or rehabilitate a property that is listed or eligible to be listed in the National Register of Historic Places and that was damaged by Hurricanes Katrina or Rita.

The Department of Archives and History is the official State Historic Preservation Office in Mississippi and handles all requests for National Register information and assistance. Congress established the National Register of Historic Places in 1966 as a list of federally recognized properties especially worthy of protection and preservation. Mississippi has more than 1200 National Register properties, including archaeological sites, battlefields, bridges, buildings, cemeteries, forts, houses, and historic districts.

The Mississippi Department of Archives and History is the second-oldest state department of archives and history in the United States. A comprehensive historical agency, the department collects, preserves, and provides access to the archival resources of the state, administers various museums and historic sites, and oversees statewide programs for historic preservation, government records management, and publications. The department is headquartered in the state-of-the-art William F. Winter Archives and History Building, located on the corner of North and Amite Streets in downtown Jackson.

Printable application and project guidelines,
Hurricane Relief Grant Program for Historic Preservation


 

First Two Grants Awards for Federal Program Made

The Department of Archives and History has awarded a quarter-million-dollar grant to Pascagoula's La Pointe-Krebs House and a $100,000 grant to the only remaining Rosenwald school on the Gulf Coast. The awards are part of the Hurricane Relief Grant Program for Historic Preservation, a new federal grant program administered by the Department of Archives and History that will distribute $26 million for properties along the Gulf Coast affected by Hurricane Katrina. The grants are available for publicly or privately owned structures listed or eligible for listing in the National Register of Historic Places.

The eighteenth-century La Pointe-Krebs HouseThe eighteenth-century La Pointe-Krebs House—also known as Old Spanish Fort—may be the oldest building in the state. The $250,000 grant will be used to make interior and exterior renovations and corrections to previous rehabilitation work to the property.

"The La Pointe-Krebs House is one of the most significant structures in the state," said MDAH director H.T. Holmes. "It has stood for hundreds of years and we are pleased to be able to help preserve it for future generations."

The Randolph School—originally the Pass Christian Colored School—was constructed in 1928 as the elementary and high school for the city's African American students. The building is undergoing a complete interior rehabilitation and exterior restoration and will be used as a community center upon completion. The Randolph School was built with help from the Julius Rosenwald Fund, a private organization founded in the 1910s which helped build more than 5,000 schools for African Americans in the South, and over 550 in Mississippi alone. These schools were mostly small frame buildings, built with a combination of Rosenwald aid, public funds, and labor and materials donated by the black community. Most have disappeared due to abandonment and deterioration. In Mississippi, only fourteen former Rosenwald schools survive.

"The Randolph School in its new capacity will be an integral part of this community for years to come," said Holmes. "The conversion of this beautiful school building to a community center is a prime example of how these significant structures can be adapted for reuse."

The Mississippi Department of Archives and History is the second-oldest state department of archives and history in the United States. The department collects, preserves, and provides access to the archival resources of the state, administers various museums and historic sites, and oversees statewide programs for historic preservation, state and local government records management, and publications. The department is headquartered in the state-of-the-art William F. Winter Archives and History Building, located on the corner of North and Amite Streets in downtown Jackson.


 

Grant Program to Fund Archaeology Projects

A new program of the Mississippi Department of Archives and History will distribute $25,000 in grants for archaeological projects across the state. The Mississippi Archaeological Research Grant Program will award grants annually to university archaeologists and graduate students for a wide range of projects, including field school excavations, analyses of collections, and laboratory testing.

"We hope this program will provide the tools to analyze archaeological data and the opportunity to publish findings by researchers who are otherwise limited by financial constraints," said Pamela Edwards Lieb, MDAH chief archaeologist.

Mississippi Archaeological Grant Program funds may be used for any public collections from Mississippi or sites located in the state. Research involving private collections is eligible if it involves a comparative analysis with a public collection. Applicants must be associated with a university or college, either as archaeological researcher, professor of archaeology or anthropology, or graduate student in archaeology or anthropology.

Applications may be printed out below or obtained through the Historic Preservation division, 601-576-6940. Completed applications are due by end of business on October 13, 2006. The board of trustees of the Department of Archives and History will award the grants at a special meeting in December 2006. Grant amounts will not exceed $10,000 per project.

"There are very few grant programs like this dedicated to archaeological research," said Ken P'Pool, director of the Historic Preservation division. "We are very proud to be able to offer these funds and expect significant work will be done to further our understanding of the history of Mississippi."

The Mississippi Department of Archives and History is a comprehensive historical agency charged with the care of official governmental records, museums, and historic preservation projects across the state. For more information call 601-576-6850 or see the Web site, www.mdah.state.ms.us.

Printable application and project guidelines,
Mississippi Archaeological Research Grant Program


 

Nearly $60,000 Awarded through CLG Grant Program

Bernheimer Building, constructed in 1872, Claiborne countyThe Department of Archives and History has awarded grants totaling more than $58,000 to fourteen preservation projects in Certified Local Government communities across the state. Amounts range from $1,250 for a survey of Indianola's historic resources to $8,740 for repairs to a Mississippi Landmark building in Port Gibson.

"The Department of Archives and History is very pleased to be able to assist these worthy projects," said Historic Preservation Division director Ken P'Pool. "We only regret we could not fully fund all of the requests."

The Certified Local Government program is a federal-state-local partnership designed to assist communities in dealing with diverse preservation needs through funding and technical assistance. CLG communities may apply for annual grants to undertake preservation projects of importance to the community. Grants may be used for such diverse projects as the restoration of historic buildings; historical, architectural, or archaeological site inventory work; preparation of nominations to the National Register of Historic Places; educational programs; and staff support for new historic preservation commissions.

The fiscal year 2006 grant awards are as follows:

Amory, $5,000, for preparation of Design Review Guidelines for the city's locally designated historic district.

Brandon, $2,000, for restoration of the brick, stone, and iron fencing around the Old Brandon Cemetery.

Claiborne County, $3,000, for the restoration of original windows on the second floor fašade of the ca. 1872 Bernheimer Building, a Mississippi Landmark.

Clarksdale, $8,000, to fund a historic resource inventory survey and a National Register district nomination that will include the New World district, downtown commercial district, and Tennessee Williams district.

Columbia, $2,625, for the preparation of Design Review Guidelines for the city's locally designated historic district.

Holly Springs, $7,150, for the ongoing restoration of the ca. 1840 First Presbyterian Church, a Mississippi Landmark. This project will involve the stabilization and restoration of the foundation sills, the outside walls, and pilasters, repair and replacement of windows, and the painting of exterior walls and trim.

Indianola, $1,250, to fund Phase II of the survey of the historic resources of the City of Indianola, begun with a FY2004 CLG grant.

Louisville, $3,000, to fund a historic resources survey of Louisville's proposed local historic district.

Oxford, $2,500, for National Register district nominations for North and South Lamar Boulevards.

Port Gibson, $8,740, for the restoration of the second-floor interior of the Meyer-Marx Building, a Mississippi Landmark.

Raymond, $2,000, for the preparation of Design Review Guidelines for the city's locally designated historic district.

Ripley, $3,000, for the preparation of Design Review Guidelines for the city's locally designated historic district.

Vicksburg, $2,800, to fund a re-survey of the resources within the locally designated Vicksburg Historic District. In addition to the current district, a one-block by three-block area will be surveyed in anticipation of this area being added to the district at the request of interested property owners. A digital photo inventory for the district will be prepared to enable the Board of Architectural Review and city staff to have readily accessible current photographs of each building within the district.

Woodville, $7,000, for the repair of the cast concrete cornice and wooden awning on the ca. 1930 Woodville Masonic Lodge Building.

To become a CLG, a community must adopt a preservation ordinance establishing a preservation commission in accordance with federal and state guidelines. Once the commission has been established, application for CLG status may be made to the National Park Service through the Department of Archives and History. MDAH works closely with local government officials and citizens to help them create and manage a workable local historic preservation program. To learn more about the CLG program, contact Todd Sanders in the Historic Preservation Division of MDAH, 601-576-6950.

The forty-seven CLG communities in Mississippi are Aberdeen, Amory, Baldwyn, Biloxi, Brandon, Canton, Carrollton, Centreville, Claiborne County, Clarksdale, Cleveland, Columbia, Columbus, Como, Corinth, Eupora, Friars Point, Greenwood, Hattiesburg, Hernando, Holly Springs, Indianola, Jackson, Kosciusko, Laurel, Leland, Lexington, Louisville, McComb, Meridian, Mound Bayou, Natchez, Ocean Springs, Oxford, Pascagoula, Philadelphia, Port Gibson, Raymond, Ripley, Tunica, Tupelo, Vaiden, Vicksburg, West, Winona, Woodville, and Yazoo City


 

2005 Community Heritage Preservation Grant Winners

Eleven preservation and restoration projects from Corinth to the Gulf Coast have been awarded a total of $2,948,000 in the fourth year of a grant program administered by the Mississippi Department of Archives and History. The Community Heritage Preservation grant program, authorized and funded through the Mississippi Legislature, helps preserve and restore historic courthouses and schools and, in Certified Local Government communities, other historic properties.

The Department of Archives and History received seventy-five applications requesting nearly $21 million. Over the life of the program the department has awarded more than $18 million in Community Heritage Preservation grants to eighty-nine projects. Ten of the eleven properties receiving grants in this round are listed on or have been nominated to the National Register of Historic Places, and two are also National Historic Landmarks-Beauvoir, in Biloxi, and the L.Q.C. Lamar House, in Oxford. Properties affected by Hurricane Katrina--Beauvoir, the Ocean Springs Community Center, and the Old Hattiesburg High School--were the recipients of $900,000 in grants.

"This program has been crucial in preserving historic structures across the state, and we are grateful to the Legislature for continuing to fund it," said H.T. Holmes, director of the Department of Archives and History. "The response from the public has been overwhelming, and we only regret that we could not have funded more of these worthy projects."

The grant awards are as follows:

Alcorn County Courthouse, Corinth-$80,000
Applicant: Alcorn County Board of Supervisors
For exterior renovation and repair to the second-floor interior

Mary Ricks Thornton Cultural Center, Kosciusko-$113,000
Applicant: Kosciusko-Attala Historical Society
For exterior and interior renovation, including painting, window, electrical, and lighting repair

Copiah County Courthouse, Hazlehurst-$475,000
Applicant: Copiah County Board of Supervisors
For exterior and interior renovation, including the restoration of the courtroom and rotunda and replacement of non-historic windows

Old Hattiesburg High School, Hattiesburg-$400,000
Applicant: City of Hattiesburg
For exterior repairs and stabilization, including roof repair

Beauvoir, Biloxi-$300,000
Applicant: Mississippi Division of the United Sons of Confederate Veterans
For exterior repairs, including roof and gallery repairs

Flannigan-Lowry House, Jackson-$150,000
Applicant: Mississippi Heritage Trust and the Mississippi Baptist Medical Center
For structure relocation and stabilization, including a new foundation and electrical work

Ocean Springs Community Center, Ocean Springs-$200,000
Applicant: City of Ocean Springs
For interior renovation, including mural conservation

L.Q.C. Lamar House, Oxford-$390,000
Applicant: Oxford-Lafayette County Heritage Foundation
For exterior and interior restoration, including roof, wood, masonry, window, and door repair

Monroe County Courthouse, Aberdeen-$420,000
Applicant: Monroe County Board of Supervisors
For exterior restoration, including courtroom restoration, masonry, window, and door repairs, and electrical and mechanical upgrades

Old Tippah County Jail, Ripley-$115,000
Applicant: Tippah County Board of Supervisors
For exterior and interior renovation, including roof and window repair

Afro-American Sons and Daughters Hospital, Yazoo City-$300,000
Applicant: Afro-American Sons and Daughters Hospital Foundation
For exterior and interior renovation

The Board of Trustees of the Department of Archives and History determined the grant recipients at a special meeting on December 9. In evaluating the grants the board attempted to balance the geographical distribution of the awards. Grant awards are paid on a reimbursable basis upon the successful completion of the entire project or at the time of the completion of pre-established phases of the project. A cash match of at least 20 percent must be provided, and prior to application all buildings must have been designated Mississippi Landmarks. For more information, call 601-576-6850.